Have You Ever Been Afraid To Give Something Like This A Try?

Podcasts, Writing

Having embarked on my audio journey last winter in the form of a 10 week course with Reprezent radio, a youth-led community radio station here in London, as a result, I developed a bit of a love affair with making radio shows. Whether it was good audio content is questionable but nevertheless I enjoyed making it and surely that counts for something, right?!

 

On completion of this course I had two options, be a radio presenter’s assistant on a voluntary basis or make my own content. Eventually after a lot of inner self-doubt I’ve mustered up the courage to start making my own radio content. 

 

Since deciding to make my own content I’ve had many ups and downs, one of which is finding a genuinely good studio to record the radio shows in. Trust me, I’ve been around! The majority were too echoey, some allowed more sound in than welcomed, for example in one place I literally have the sound recordings of the maintenance guy burping in the background. I keep this version of my rudimentary show in a saved folder ofcourse to laugh at it on days when I feel like shit. After much trial and error, and finding no luck in cheap studios (I don’t have the budget for £50 an hour studios), I finally arrived at the stage where I was sitting on a bean bag in my cupboard insulated with pillows trying to crack jokes over and over again down the mic. Nothing is more awkward, trust me! And through this little makeshift haven I managed to thread together a pilot. I then, after much deliberation, sent it off to a local station in Shoreditch. I pretty much expected no reply, but to my surprise they actually decided to take me on and give me my own radio show ! I kept thinking to myself, they must’ve heard the wrong thing, not my show haha – if you wanna check out the pilot just click the link at the bottom of this post. 

 

Now I’m currently in the process of making my second show. I went to their recording studios yesterday and to record it in the moment. Let’s say I’ve got a long way to go but atleast I’m trying after half a year of stalling. I feel good about that, even though I’m now cringing at every badly pronounced word that comes out of my mouth on the recording ahahaa. 

 

Have you ever been afraid to give something like this a try? 

If you’re interested in checking out my first show, just click here

Whats In A Tattoo Cover Art

Audio: What’s In A Tattoo?

Podcasts

Whats In A Tattoo Cover Art

What’s In A Tattoo?

 

Do you have  tattoo? If yes/no, why? Are they works of art, or, blights to our sight?

For some they are sentimental expressions of inner emotions, for others, regrets on a drunken night out which they can’t live down. When I see someone with a tattoo I think to myself that they must have a story behind it. I’m fascinated by tattoos. Aren’t you?

My mini audio documentary aims to highlight my inner thoughts about this artistic imprinting practice. I touch on the pain, question the motives, and ask if there really needs to be any?

This is my first audio piece, sorry if it sounds sh*te! I found it enjoyable to make!

Thank you for listening!

 

podcast audio credits

Tattoo Gun Sound – Credits to Shall555

Piano Music – Credits to ShadyDave

Native American Flute – Credits to ethang

Synth Bed – Credits to Andrewkn

ASMR Youtube phenomenon close up photography of woman wearing blue collared shirt

ASMR – Does It Work On You?

Writing

Sometimes I have out-of-body body moments and starkly  realise that I’ve just been entranced by some sorcerer on YouTube swishing saliva about in her mouth, repeating the word ‘stipple’ about a million times and making weird butterfly motions with her fingers. Please help me!

Is anyone else grossly engrossed by this phenomenon?

Some of my favourite videos include:

 

Why do we like ASMR so much?

‘Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response’ or as The Guardian so eloquently puts it, these ‘head orgasms’ are a result of our senses being stimulated, specifically by an external source known as a ‘trigger’ which creates a tingling-like sensation normally starting at the scalp and evolving down the spine.

The human reaction to the stimuli varies from person to person, with some people not even reacting to the triggers at all (poor people). Science is yet to quite understand why this characteristic has came to be, what purpose does it serve?

Whether we know this answer scientifically, I myself find it useful in combating stress, others have reported the beneficial effects ASMR also, including  lowering levels of depression and increasing relaxation. So surely it serves some purpose, and morseo, a positive one.

Some popular triggers include:

  • Mouth smacking
  • Whispering
  • Nail Tapping
  • Crinkling

Why doesn’t ASMR work on everyone?

It may be that different people have different thresholds to biological stimuli, as The List states. Going further it may infact BE on a physiological scale. With the focus being on how endorphins are produced in each of our bodies. It may be that people who produce endorphins more easily or have sensitive endorphin receptors  will react to an ASMR stimulus more easily than someone with a lower or slower endorphin rate of release.

Who knows, maybe it’s just one of these quirks of nature? Let’s see what science says  in the coming years. As something tells me ASMR is staying around long enough to have a few lab tests ran on it!

 

**I don’t own any copyright to the videos**

 

 

person wearing red lipstick biting film Blue yeti microphone being discussed in relation to podcast recording

The Woes Of Recording Your Own Voice.

Writing

So, here I am, staring down the barrel of a gun, otherwise known as my Blue Yeti USB microphone. My lip starts to quiver then an absolute torrent of inaudible words start spewing out of my mouth uncontrollably. I’m supposed to be doing my intro to my very first podcast but instead I’m building up a sweat and the odd heart palpitation.

Should I make a script or just ad lib it? Well, as I’ve just mentioned above, the ‘off the bat’ approach just wasn’t cutting the mustard so I decided to jot down a few bullet points. You know, just things like not forgetting to mention ‘hello’, or my name, or why I’m even doing the damn podcast, pretty much every word I would most likely forget had I not clamped the post-it note down to the desk right infront of me.

So with the  script in place and microphone at the ready I start talking gibberish. I stutter, I mumble, I do everything in my power to seem absolutely powerless to my nerves. But why am I so nervous, it’s just me in the room (I hope)? But microphones are intimidating objects, like uncorked wine bottles, just begging you to drink their insides. As I stare down at my mic it glares back up at me and begins to whisper about how groggy my voice will sound on the recording, how everyone listening will laugh at me, how I need a lozenge asap. I silence my mic by suffocating it with my hand, I slam the switch off and I begin the cry into my hands. Will this podcast ever come to be I ask myself?

Days go by, and each time I walk passed my mic it hisses at me with spite. I lock it in the cupboard fearing that I’ll never get to record my thoughts on the taste of water or whether Veganism is just a fad. Holding on to the rough recordings I made before my mic mouthed off at me, I decided to have a moment of insanity and play them back on my laptop.

All I can say is, well…….nothing at all really. I was floored, speechless, by the sound of my own slurred words. To say it sounded like nails on a chalk board would be an understatement. My microphone was right! I sounded like sh*t!

I haven’t used my mic or opened my mouth since, this was weeks ago, will I ever speak again and even more importantly than that, will me and Mikey ever rekindle our friendship?? TBC