Poem – I Will Remember

Writing

Entangled in a web of grief,

Spiralling out of control.

Swig a bottle of cyanide, should I?

To let the pain mellow?

 

I couldn’t bear to bring myself,

To meet such ill a fate.

Instead I took a sip once more,

Of lemon and ginger ale.

 

I sip and reminisce,

 Of how life used to be.

When we would pick the daisies,

Beneath  the cherry trees.

 

I remember when you would hold my hand.

And tell me you’d never let go.

Your warm breath against my cheek,

Almost as warm as your smile, it glowed.

 

Forever I will love you,

Forever you shall be missed.

Heaven will always have taken you, 

Too early for me to accept.

If only God knew the pain I felt,

Then the angels would truly have wept.

 

Life – is but a fragile thing.

So precious, so easily lost.

If I could pray for just one thing,

It would be for you to come back to my arms. 

 

A close friend of mine recently lost her Father, he passed away while they were on family holiday. I dedicate this poem to her.

Have You Ever Been Afraid To Give Something Like This A Try?

Podcasts, Writing

Having embarked on my audio journey last winter in the form of a 10 week course with Reprezent radio, a youth-led community radio station here in London, as a result, I developed a bit of a love affair with making radio shows. Whether it was good audio content is questionable but nevertheless I enjoyed making it and surely that counts for something, right?!

 

On completion of this course I had two options, be a radio presenter’s assistant on a voluntary basis or make my own content. Eventually after a lot of inner self-doubt I’ve mustered up the courage to start making my own radio content. 

 

Since deciding to make my own content I’ve had many ups and downs, one of which is finding a genuinely good studio to record the radio shows in. Trust me, I’ve been around! The majority were too echoey, some allowed more sound in than welcomed, for example in one place I literally have the sound recordings of the maintenance guy burping in the background. I keep this version of my rudimentary show in a saved folder ofcourse to laugh at it on days when I feel like shit. After much trial and error, and finding no luck in cheap studios (I don’t have the budget for £50 an hour studios), I finally arrived at the stage where I was sitting on a bean bag in my cupboard insulated with pillows trying to crack jokes over and over again down the mic. Nothing is more awkward, trust me! And through this little makeshift haven I managed to thread together a pilot. I then, after much deliberation, sent it off to a local station in Shoreditch. I pretty much expected no reply, but to my surprise they actually decided to take me on and give me my own radio show ! I kept thinking to myself, they must’ve heard the wrong thing, not my show haha – if you wanna check out the pilot just click the link at the bottom of this post. 

 

Now I’m currently in the process of making my second show. I went to their recording studios yesterday and to record it in the moment. Let’s say I’ve got a long way to go but atleast I’m trying after half a year of stalling. I feel good about that, even though I’m now cringing at every badly pronounced word that comes out of my mouth on the recording ahahaa. 

 

Have you ever been afraid to give something like this a try? 

If you’re interested in checking out my first show, just click here

B*tch Stole My Work

Writing

“It’s fine though, I changed the font so it’s mine now”. 

 

What would be worse, pitching article ideas  to a magazine company only to have them reject you and for you later to find out that they’ve posted pieces online which obviously spawned from your very original idea? 

Or having the magazine agree to commission you, you spend weeks perfecting the piece, only to find that once it is published your name is nowhere to be seen, yet instead it says something along the lines of ‘written by author of ‘X’ magazine team’?Your name is not listed, just the term author, or worse the commissioning editor’s name as the author. This has happened to me. 

To me both are appalling but the second is saddeningly worse. To not credit the creator of the work be it writing, artwork or any other medium is not just morally wrong it is illegal. 

 

It’s saddening to think that there are people out there who would quite happily take my articles and not credit me on them. 

This kind of thing makes me not want to pitch my ideas to people. Has this ever happened to you, how do you or how  would you deal with it?

 

Because once you realise they’ve not credited you correctly you then have to sum up whether you want to confront them on this or just accept the unfairness. If they are a large magazine company do you really want to bring this conversation to the doorstep, will this block you from writing for them again? But then again as it stands without your name on the article it looks like you never have written for them  anyway, so you might aswell fight your corner I guess. 

 

Apologies for the rant, I think I’m just sick of the above happening to me. And wondered if I’m not alone with this?

Why Are We So Messy?

Writing

If you’re a messy son of a b*tch like me then you should be shouting that fact from the rooftops, hilltops and every other kind of top out there. Wear your messiness like a medal of honour my friend. Let me tell for you why:

1. It boosts your immune system

Yes mouldy pots and pans are breeding grounds for bacteria. Which means sparring grounds for your little friend – the immune system. Exposing it to all types of bacteria will do you a world of good. If you’ve never had food poisoning in your life then thank your messy kitchen habits, don’t blame them!

Moving on!

2. You have time to do the important sh*t  

Why scrub the floors in your marigolds when you could be throwing ball with your son or catching up with old friends? Leave the spillage where it is! If someone falls on their ear, fate made it so, not you!!

3. Your blood pressure will thank you 

Anytime guests come over you won’t be running around like a headless chicken picking up the crumbs of the all butter shortbread you’ve just gave them with their cup of tea. If they drop a crumb it’s all good, the dust bunnies will nibble on it later. 

4. It feels more homely

 A home is meant to be a home not a live-in museum! Why would I want any guests feeling like they have to walk on eggshells for fear of accidentally knocking over my 16th century antique crystal? I want them to put their feet up and relax, nothing says relaxation like an already stained sofa, right?

“Embrace the glorious mess that you are.” – Elizabeth Gilbert

Quantity Over Quality

Writing

I wouldn’t blame you for thinking I’d somehow dropped off the face of the Earth in the last month or so. Eating copious amounts of junk food while watching documentaries on how paintbrushes and heavy-duty bin bags are made has that effect on you. You just drift away from life’s priorities like a plank of wood cast out to sea.

 

Oddly enough, I admittedly don’t know why I paused momentarily with the blog. It’s not like I  fell out of love with writing but moreso perhaps I fell out of love with the way I was writing.  

 

Quality took second place to quantity, I didn’t write what I wanted to write, yet more of what I thought you wanted to see. Which in the end wasn’t as fulfilling as I had intended it to be.Surely every blogger/writer/content creator goes through a stage like this, no?

 

Anyway, with my sanity returning slowly but surely, I endeavour to get back on track. Writing content for you to enjoy and for me to cringe at later in time (like this post)!

Happy reading!

Poem: Winter

Writing

Crimson embers of fire crackle,

Beneath the pale moon light.

The stars they twinkle like tiny freckles,

Upon the face of the night.

 

The sun awakens, from its slumbers,

Naked vegetation shivers with delight.

For they are scarce, they’re few in number,

Desperate for the light.

 

The season sets a spell of slumber,

Upon the many lives,

Of plants and animals growing fonder,

To sleeping day and night.

 

This too shall pass,

It just takes might,

Time will change,

The clock will strike.

 

A day will come,

Where we can surrender the fight,

Of surviving these testing hardships,

But until then. Goodnight.

 

 

The Best Worst Halloween Costumes

Writing

Halloween is arguably one of the more ‘fun’ holidays of the year, when else do you have an excuse to dress up as giant genitalia or………

A Venus Fly Trap

Venus Fly Trap Costume - best worst Halloween costumes

Escapade certainly haven’t left any out any costume of the imagination as it proudly displays the purchasable plant + pot duo online. (Image courtesy of Escapade)

Roadkill

Roadkill fancy dress costume sold by Rasta Imposta. Best worst Halloween costumes 2018

Going to the complete other end of the spectrum now for all you animal lovers out there. Yes, ‘roadkill’ can be sported by those bordering on insanity this Halloween courtesy of Rasta Imposta The fact that there’s a kid in there makes it all the more disturbing! Don’t you think? (Image courtesy of Amazon).

The Addicts Combo

Worst Halloween Costumes 2018

So wrong but so right at the same time, I don’t know who owns this picture but I want to thank you and shake my head in shame at the same time for releasing this to the world.

Baby Pot Leaf

baby pot leaf worst halloween costumes 2018

There’s a bit of a foliage trend going on here, first the fly trap now this, thank you for this cute yet disturbing image Daily Beast.

I Can’t

Worst Halloween Costumes 2018

Ebay why! 😦 I had to keep the best, I mean worst till last, right?!

 

art dancing female flame learning aerial silks circus arts

My Goal To learn Aerial Silks

Writing

Most people pick up a hobby like going swimming or painting at weekends, I’ve decided to pack all that in and run away to the circus.  Not literally but……physically. In the form of ‘aerial silks’. For anyone who is none the wiser as to what this mysterious terms refers to, let me enlighten you.

It’s basically the most elegant way to slip a spinal disc, fall to your death, or, do both, with such finesse. Yes, indeed, signing away my soul was as easy as a £250 transaction  and turning up to the first of 10 weekly lessons.

Things must be going somewhat ok because I’m on lesson 5 this week and well…..as you can tell I’m still here, or else it’s my ghost writing this post. Which is very plausible.

But really why have I decided to embark on this elegant challenge? It is because of just that – it’s a challenge. Don’t get me wrong, being ‘comfortable’ is great, sitting at home watching Netflix really does sound ideal 9/10 times for me. But for about a year now there’s been this little nagging voice in my head encouraging me to try something new, to do something different. And this difference was in the form of actually getting myself off the sofa and into the realms of uncertainly in the form of a big silky green curtain with too much give and not enough grip.

The aim of this challenge is with any to learn and progress. I do feel like I’m getting better if only slowly. In the first week I couldn’t even climb off of the ground, by week 5 I can climb a decent height and tumble purposefully and no longer accidentally.

My goal is to perform a choreographed piece without any flops which actually looks half decent. So watch this space, I’m planning to post it on here when I’m successful!

Being comfortable is boring, what challenge will you try to develop yourself for the better?

5 Overrated Creative Jobs (Plus Alternatives)

Writing
  1. Travel Writer: picture sipping martini’s on the coast of Mexico, you do the odd bit of typing up here and there but all in all the job is a doss about. Most of your time is spent chatting up the coastguard and asking locals where the best restaurants are. Or do you? Perhaps instead you’re sitting sweaty in a non-air conditioned hotel room, torrential rain outside and you now have to go speak to local farmers on how they grow their Scarlet Queen turnips. Oh Joy.

Salaries: £20,000+

Alternative: Newspaper columnist, comfy office chair and no need to talk about turnips (hopefully).

  1. Chef: This is creative. Don’t tell me it’s not! From food presentation to taste combinations the job seems like a creative haven for the budding food lover. But! Slaving over a hot stove for 10 hours straight, all while getting an earful from the head chef who’s just broken up with his wife (for the second time) all because you blanched the cabbage that millisecond too long.

Alternative: Cookery school teacher, restaurant owner, TV chef.

Salaries: £25,000+

  1. Model: How glamorous, ‘everyone wants to take pictures of me’, you get to sport all the latest gear, set the trends and perhaps even develop an eating disorder in the process. Not to stereotype the industry but this serious issue can’t be brushed under the rug when it comes to modelling. Strenuous work schedules, constantly living out of suitcases all for a 2 hour photo shoot before your whisked off to the next place. Not saying the whole industry is a farce but it certainly has room for improvement.

Salaries: £25,000+

Alternative: Fashion blogger/influencer, Stylist, Fashion Designer, Social Media Influencer.

  1. Animator: No quicker way to go blind than trying to sketch out Ariel for the millionth time. Sure, seeing The Little Mermaid make it to the big screen would be such an achievement if you weren’t squinting behind your bi-focals.

Salaries: £24,000+

Alternative: Caricature artist, (wear better glasses), Gallery artist.

  1. Event Coordinator: You can see it now, ballet dancers break off to the wings to reveal the dazzling host for this year’s major corporate party. Everyone applauds you in the audience for organising the event , it ran so smoothly. Then you wake up from your sweet slumbers and realise you have to phone up 50 doughnut vans before lunchtime for next week’s charity supporting injured stunt dolphins. You then check the diary only to realise you have a meeting in two minutes for Friday’s city parade. You’re spread too thinly and underpaid!

Salaries: 20,000+

Alternative: Wedding planner (stick to one kind of event)!

Note all of these jobs may seem overrated in general but at the end of the day if you have a passion for any job regardless of general critique. Just bloody go for it and be the judge for yourself whether it’s overrated or not.

 

**Please note this article is intended for ERIC Mag, and I will link to the article on their site if/when it becomes live.

 

 

Places In London To Chat To Other Creatives.

Writing

Such a big city with big opportunities to get creative. So what places do I know of which offer just this:

1) The Southbank Centre – home to festivals, dance, comedy shows and exhibitions. You’re guaranteed to get those creative juices flowing at the centre. With wide open spaces you can meet with others for a coffee or even a rehearsal of your next show.  From panel shows on how to get a literary agent to workshops on how to play Gamelan instruments, you’re spoilt for choice!

  1. Go Think Big – I should really pitch up tent outside their offices, for I never seem to be out of them. They offer a real smorgasbord of events, activities and workshops for creative young people. Not so long ago they had a workshop on how to handle stress and an upcoming one is based on vlogging as two examples. The breadth they cover really does mean whatever creative flair you have will be encouraged to grow. Infact they even have what looks like a really good networking event coming up very soon here. Give it a go!
  2. MeetUp – so not conventionally a go to ‘place’ to meet other creatives but this site aims to get people together to create based on a similarity in hobbies and so focus groups are created which host events all over the city. From graffiti art walking tours to special effects makeup for horror films, the site has an abundance of groups to join and get creative.
  3. ERIC Festival – last but certainly not least, our very own ERIC! Having attended several of their festivals hosted at the Hospital club from music to musical theatre, I’d definitely recommended anyone who has a creative bone in their body to shimmy on down to their next event. You might even get a job out of it, that’s what happened to me! You meet a contact who could eventually become a colleague, you just never know!

 

I hope the above help you mingle till your heart’s content. In addition to these, London offers a real range of hidden gems also, perhaps venturing off the road most trekked on once in a while will lead you to a creative revelation. If not, just go back to bed. Kidding!

**Please note this article is intended solely for ERIC Mag, and I will link to the article on their site if/when it becomes live.

The Bookworm In All Of Us

Writing

7 top books to unleash your creative potential

For alot of the time, being creative means being resilient. Baring your soul to the world can lead to many highs and lows. For this reason I have a few books up my sleeve which may help see you through any situation. In addition to some lighter reading ofcourse!

 

  1. The Subtle Art Of Not Giving A F*ck

As heart-warming as the title sounds, this book really does make you think about your priorities! We get wrapped up, worrying about the smallest things, this book helps you see what really matters i.e. the meaning behind your lyrics coming across rather than aiming for the perfect recording quality or getting your art to exhibition not worrying about how many people turn up to see it. Summary: Spend less time worrying about how others will perceive you and just release your creativity already!

  1. Steal Like An Artist

Dabbling around the idea of ‘originality’, that nothing is ever truly original. Yet the author Austin Kleon gets this message cross in such a friendly manner that you accept this without (much of) a fight! The point in case is that it’s not about creating the most unique art, yet instead, being as true to yourself as you can be. Summary: highlighting the necessity of being the individual when it comes to creativity through ten top tips definitely worth sticking on the fridge door..

  1. Creative Confidence

Flipping the idea of what a ‘creative person’ looks like on its head, this thought-provoking book, eloquently acknowledges that each one of us is infact creative. Some struggle to tap into their creativity but this by no means does not mean that they don’t have the ability to be creative. The authors  Tom Kelley and David Kelley act as the saving grace to anyone who is struggling to unleash their creative potential by sharing with us the principles and strategies which they hold dear. Summary: Lawyer, Painter, Accountant or Writer – we all have creativity, yet we all don’t know how to release this, well perhaps now you do.

  1. Bird By Bird

As offbeat as the title, the author Anne Lamott certainly likes to dance to the beat of her own drum in this go – to guide combining writing wisdom with self-help scenarios. I don’t know what’s more engaging, her writing style or what she’s actually writing about! Using her own words as a summary: “Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. ………. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again.”

  1. The Tenacity Of The Cockroach

Perhaps the best way to be creative is learn from the best. Stephen Thompson emphasises just that in his interviews with the likes of Gene Simmons and ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic. By reading this you will gain an insight into how some of the most creative minds think and how they built their careers in the creative world, so hopefully you can take inspiration from them and build yours too. Summary: biographical but not in the boring way!

  1. The Accidental Creative

Todd Henry provides both a witty and informative short novel ‘how to be brilliant at a moments notice’. We all take mental blocks and have days when we don’t perform at our best, so how can we put our creativity to use in the blink of an eye? Well, perhaps Henry will have the answers? Summary: Engaging food for thought.

  1. The Art of Work: A Proven Path to Discovering What You Were Meant to Do

Maybe you are at a stage where you know you want to follow a creative career, but aren’t exactly sure what in? Jeff Goins’ insightful read directs us down a path of self-discovery. He emphasises how bravery is essential in finding the creative career you are truly meant to follow. Summary: An eye-opening and inspirational read.

I hope these books don’t collect dust on your mantelpiece and atleast one of them brings some solace to your life. If not, keep searching for a book that does. Once you read that sentence which gives you that ‘aha’ moment, then you’re on the right track to releasing your true creative ability. You can do it!

**Please note this article is intended solely for ERIC Mag, and I will link to the article on their site if/when it becomes live.

5 Creatively Inspiring Places

Writing

That dreaded moment has arrived, you’ve hit a mental block, creative juices have well and truly ceased to flow. You are however, now salivating about what you’re going to have for tea and not what your next big project will be. Oh dear, what should you do ( I can’t answer that) and where should you go to get that slap in the face to get focused again (I’ll give this one a go):

  1. Your Bedroom

Go here for a good cry into the pillow, or scream…..and punch. Not inciting violence of any kind, but we all have our moments of mini-meltdowns, there’s no shame in letting it all out! You’ll clear your mind and find that you can probably re-focus alot faster after doing so.

  1. Parks

The leafy kind over the concrete jungle kind if possible. Sometimes it’s this complete change of scenery which helps clear your mind and lifts your mood. Even if the weather is sh*te, sometimes sitting with your thoughts in the rain  can be refreshing (and other times slightly creepy to the passerby).

  1. Museums

Perhaps it’s not a clear head that you need, but an influx of inspiration! And no better place than a building full of pottery, paintings and plasticine.

  1. A church

Pray to God to grant you some creative miracles! Just kidding, churches are some of the most architecturally fascinating buildings, rich in history and aesthetically decadent, this makes for one heavenly place of inspiration. Likewise can be said for buildings such as old banks, hospitals and schools.

  1. A cafe

People watching (in the non-stalkerish way) can be really fascinating, how we move, our body language between eachother, are daily activities can all be platforms to build on  creative expression e.g. dance, paintings and documentaries. Perhaps all you need to do to pick up the pace of generating ideas is to actually take a step back and slow down. Take in the world around you.

 

I hope these ideas are helpful, if not, sorry, I tried. We all take mental blocks, we’re human. Just don’t take them that often (if possible). Now what are you waiting for? Start punching your pillow (joke)!

 

**Please note this article is intended solely for ERIC Mag, and I will link to the article on their site if/when it becomes live.

4 Freelance Budgeting Tips

Writing

Oh the joys of being freelance, no one trying to be your boss, no strict times to be in work for, and no food on the f*cking table! Or atleast that’s how it feels if you try and make a living the D.I.Y. way (initially atleast). So how can you survive living ‘minimalist’ until your paining sells for millions?

  1. Buy your equipment in bulk – yes I know the saying quality not quantity, but this doesn’t always hold true. Yet, more likely than not you will save if you buy in bulk than if not for example art kits for special effects make up – it’s better to buy the kit than each component individually form sites such as – e.g. PAM do bulk kits for make-up artists
  2. Sign up to creative membership and discount sites in general such as: NUS, Sally’s discount card for beauty professionals, trade shows such as IMATS are also great ways to get discounted products which would otherwise be very expensive instore. I’ve used a make-up artist example here but the points carry through for a range of creative disciplines.
  3. Create a budget planner or download a budgeting app – it’s hard to keep track of finances in normal day to day situations never mind when you’re trying to run your own business. Taking time now to plan out a planner or use an app will save you time and money in the long-run.
  4. Make your own tip jar – although we live in a world where we use physical cash less and less, there’s still no harm in collecting up those odd bits of loose change instead of impulsively spending them on a packet of crisps. Or even better you could set up your own fort of reward system, say at the end of each week you could tip yourself for completing ‘x’ number of goals. Nothing wrong with a bit of self-reward!

Freelancing isn’t for the faint-hearted but then again great things don’t come out of safety. I hope however that the above tips make your finances that little bit more secure as you progress in your chosen creative field!

**Please note this article is intended solely for ERIC Mag, and I will link to the article on their site if/when it becomes live.